Country Comparison

Global Mobile Usage By Country

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Global Legal Systems : Country Comparison

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Civil law systems have drawn their inspiration largely from the Roman law heritage and which, by giving precedence to written law, have resolutely opted for a systematic codification of their general law. It is the most widespread system of law in the world.
Common law systems is a legal system founded not on laws made by legislatures but on judge-made laws, which in turn are based on custom, culture, habit, and previous judicial decisions throughout the world.
Customary law systems, traditional common rule or practice that has become an intrinsic part of the accepted and expected conduct in a community, profession, or trade and is treated as a legal requirement. Today, hardly any political entity in the world operates under a legal system which could be said to be typically and wholly customary.
Muslim law systems is an autonomous legal system which is of a religious nature and predominantly based on the Koran.
Mixed law systems political entities where two or more systems apply cumulatively or interactively.

Global Fixed Telephone Lines

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This world map shows Number of Fixed Telephone Lines by Country, per 100 people.
Current worldwide number of fixed telephone lines: 17.2 per 100 people (2010)
17.8 per 100 people (2009)
Main (fixed) telephone lines refer to telephone lines connecting a customer’s equipment (e.g., telephone set, facsimile machine) to the Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) and which have a dedicated port on a telephone exchange. Note that for most countries, main lines also include public payphones. Many countries also include ISDN channels in main (fixed) lines (see below ISDN and ADSL).
Main (fixed) telephone lines per 100 inhabitants is calculated by dividing the number of main lines by the population and multiplying by 100.

World Economy Comparison : Good Times Vs Bad Time

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Which economies have fared best and worst during the global financial crisis?
GDP growth rates slowed sharply in most rich economies in the second quarter. So where does that leave output relative to its level before the start of the financial crisis? If we rank the G7 countries according to the change in real GDP since the end of 2007, Canada tops the league. But Canada, like the United States, has a fast-growing population, whereas the number of Germans and Japanese has started to shrink. GDP per person is therefore a better measure of relative performance.
 As the chart below shows, by this gauge Canada is still 1% below its pre-crisis level and America is 3.5% down. Among the G7 countries only Germany has regained its end-2007 level. Comparing output now with its level before the crisis actually understates the depth of the slump. An alternative yardstick (see article) is to compare GDP per head now with what might have been expected if it had continued to grow at the same pace as during the ten years before the crisis. On this basis, even Germany has not yet caught up, and Ireland’s income per head is now a painful 25% below its previous trend.

Corruption Comparison : Private Sector vs Public Sector

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BRIBERY involves two parties, not one. Lambasting officials in poor countries for their sticky fingers is easier (and less open to legal challenge) than investigating the outsiders who suborn them. On November 2nd Transparency International (TI), a Berlin-based campaigning group, published its Bribe Payers Index. Based on questions to 3,000 businessmen, this ranks 28 countries (accounting for 80% of global trade and investment) by the perceived likelihood of their companies paying bribes when doing business abroad. Construction and industries involving government contracts, unsurprisingly, were the dirtiest. This index shows a different side of bribery from TI’s Corruption Perceptions Index, which focuses on corruption in the public sector. Putting them together, there is a strong correlation between corruption in the public and private sectors.

Insufficiently Active Population: Country Comparison

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This map shows percentage of defined population(aged 15 or above; age-standardized estimate) attaining less than 5 times 30 minutes of moderate activity per week, or less than 3 times 20 minutes of vigorous activity per week, or equivalent.

Global Tax Rates Comparison: US vs World

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If you plan on making a lot of money, you might want to move to Switzerland. The Swiss don’t tax income all that heavily, charging an income tax of anywhere from zero percent to 13.2 percent.
You don’t want to move to Denmark, though. Yes, the people of Denmark are regularly voted to be the happiest people on Earth. It’s uncertain, though, how many of these polls take place at tax time. The government in Denmark charges income tax rates ranging from 38 percent to 59 percent. Imagine trying to get away with that in the United States.
In fact, the United States is fairly mild when it comes to income tax rates. The government here collects taxes equal to 15 percent to 35 percent of citizens’ yearly income, depending on how much money they make. Despite the country’s middling tax ways, complaining about income taxes has long been a U.S. institution. Americans have been grumbling about income taxes since 1862, when the Income Tax Law was signed.
This law, by the way, was established to pay for the Civil War. The fact that U.S. citizens are still paying income taxes today, long after the Civil War has ended, is testament to the widely held belief that the federal government will never let go of a tax or fee once it’s been established.
Other countries with notable income tax rates include neighboring Canada, which collects from 15 to 29 percent of its residents’ incomes in taxes. In Mexico, the government charges taxes equal to anywhere from zero percent to 28 percent of its citizens’ incomes.
Other counties have extremely wide ranges when it comes to the income taxes that they levy. In Iceland, for example, citizens pay anywhere from none of their incomes to 37 percent in taxes. In Sweden, that range swings from nothing to 57 percent. And in France, citizens pay anywhere from 5 percent of their income to 40 percent of their income in taxes each year. ( source : Creditloan.com)